Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Book Marketing—Part 3

Continuing my series of blog on book marketing, here are a few more tactics and resources you may find useful. My listings of book marketing tactics and resources are all too few. I welcome your recommendations, especially information on things that have worked well for you. Help me to grow this information by commenting on this blog or sending me an e-mail to maggielyons66 at gmail dot com. I am especially short of good technological tips and tools.

SEO: Learn the basics of search engine optimization. You’ll find tips at Brick Marketing’s blog, http://www.brickmarketing.com/blog/seo-campaign.htm. Karen Cioffi also lists websites offering free keyword tools on her Resources page at http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/writing-resources.html and an article titled “SEO Marketing Tips to Help Get Links to Your Site” at http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/2011/11/seo-marketing-tips-to-help-get-links-to.html.

Books on SEO include Ranking #1: 50 Essential SEO Tips by James Beswick and SEO Made Simple: Strategies for Dominating the World's Largest Search Engine by Michael H. Fleischner. 
Speaking engagements and workshops

Contact libraries, schools (private and state), book clubs, alumni associations, community service clubs, local bookstores, associations—any organization that could have a direct interest in your book and offer a program that introduces you and/or your book to kids, teachers, parents, librarians, and other book buyers. 


You may have to volunteer your program to start with because budgets, especially at libraries and schools, are tight.

School visits: For tips on successful school visits see Kim Norman’s site at http://www.kimnormanbooks.comAlexis O’Neill’s site at www.schoolvisitsexperts.com
and Rachelle Burk’s site at http://rachelleburk-authorvisits.blogspot.comRachelle’s site also lists other school visits resources. At Margot Finke’s site you can find out about her experience of a virtual school visit via Skype, http://www.margotfinke.com. Information on Skype library or classroom visits can be found at http://skypeanauthor.wetpaint.com.

Sponsor: Find an influential person to champion your book. Look for some theme in your book that relates in some way to someone who has the power to promote your book to a large audience. For example, if your book has the overt or underlying theme of diabetes, you could look for a diabetes- or health-related organization whose leadership may be willing to help you promote it if you can persuade them that your book will, in turn, help to promote the work of their organization.

Virtual book tour: A reasonably priced virtual book tour service may be helpful, but do a tour for at least a month, if not two, and be prepared to put some careful thought into writing several articles for guest blogs and answering author interview questions. Exercise caution when selecting the service. Go to your social forums and ask for your fellow children's authors’ recommendations. Tour services vary widely in quality. You need to be sure the tour visits locations that are influential and appropriate for your genre. The Society of Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) provides a short list of book tour services focusing on children's authors that SCBWI members can benefit from. Dana Lynn Smith, author of Virtual Book Tour Magic, has a useful site at www.thesavvybookmarketer.com.

Web page monitoring
To be a successful book promoter and writer you should read widely, but keeping up with ever-changing blog sites and other sources of information can be a challenge. Change Detection at http://www.changedetection.com will notify you when a web page changes, for example, when a new blog appears on a site you’re following. 

4 comments:

  1. Great ideas Maggie. I still have so much to learn about marketing my books, advertising, blogging, facebook etc., it is scary!

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  2. There's a ton you can do, but don't over do it. That's the focus of an upcoming blog. You can't do everything, so focus on just a few things. As time goes by, you'll find out what works best for you.

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  3. Your book marketing series is a valuable resource for children's authors. I released a non-fiction e-book for girls in Oct. and I feel like I have been floundering in attempts at book marketing.
    You gave us some real, concrete ways to target our efforts. I think it is especially difficult to find reviewers for non-fiction books. But I bet I will through your resources. Thanks so much!

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